Student Engagement Conference | London

Programme – 19 October 2023

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  • evasys Student Engagement Conference Programme: Thursday, 19 October 2023

09:30

Registration

10:00

Welcome and housekeeping

10:10

Opening Keynote: Creating Student Engagement for the Future: Designs and Benefits
Professor Gilly Salmon, PhD., PFHEA., NTF., CEO and Principal Consultant, Education Alchemists Ltd

10:45

PARALLEL SESSION 1

 

Workshop 1  (Chancellors Hall)

Workshop 2  (G3)

Workshop 3  (G4)

 

Co-creation through
Scholarship
Danielle Thibodeau, Graeme
Hathaway and Elise Omfalos,
Queen Mary University of
London

Enhancing Student Engagement through structured Personal Tutoring
Dr David Grey, UKAT

Building student-centric
services: Unlocking
Innovation in Student
Engagement
Colum Mackey, Greenwich
Students’ Union and Tania
Struetzel, University of
Greenwich

  • 11.45 am: Refreshment Break

12:00

PARALLEL SESSION 2

 

Paper presentations A (Chancellors Hall)
Chair: Dr Helena Lim

Paper presentations B (G3)
Chair: Bruce Johnson

Paper presentations C  (G4)
Chair: Glenda Saint John

 

1. Using creative enquiry to empower student voice: experiences from Queen Mary University of London
Dr Louise Younie, Dr Ana Cabral, Dr Stephanie Fuller, Stephanie Fuller et al, QMUL
2. Photovoice for advanced learning among first-year BA students  
Louise Taylor and Christie Johnson, London College of Communication, University of the Arts

3. Motivating international postgraduate taught students at UK business schools – bridging the chasm of student expectation and institutional reality
Ann Qian, Chester Business School

4. Developing a data-driven
module enhancement
service

Jonathan Thomas, University of London

5. Harnessing evaluation for data-driven decision making
Sophie Leslie, Swansea University

6. Student Voice and its many colours 
Emily Chapman, SOAS, University of London

 

7. A National Approach to Empowering Learners and Enhancing Student Engagement in Higher Education in Ireland
Sean O’Reilly, Technological Higher Education Association

8. Reflections from Office: A sabbatical officer’s reflection of student engagement and voice in Higher Education (HE) teaching and learning.
Callum Perry, University of East Anglia

9. Understanding how students engage with their studies
Professor Gill Knight, Royal Holloway, University of London

  • 13.00 pm: Lunch

13:45

 PARALLEL SESSION 3

 

Workshop 4   (Chancellors Hall)

Workshop 5 (G3)                                       

Workshop 6 (G4)                                        

 

Creating new futures for engagement: using a rich picture to facilitate collaborative and dynamic thinking
Professor Gilly Salmon and Rod Angood

NSS: one size fits all? A peer learning discussion
Dr Helena Lim, evasys and
Huw Morgan-Jones,
University of London

Co-creation from the ground up: address inequalities in higher education in and through the curriculum with student voice
Dr Kate Cuthbert, Sally Andrews and Jameelia Stephenson

14:45

PARALLEL SESSION 4

 

Roundtable Discussion 1  (Chancellors Hall)

Roundtable Discussion 2 (G3)

Roundtable Discussion 3  (G4)

 

Why we must engage all student groups in higher education governance structures
Dr Diana Beech, London Higher

Elevating Student Engagement: Pre-Arrival Surveys in Higher Education
Bruce Johnson, evasys with
Lia Lawson & Jacob Pepper,
Middlesex University

Safe, Sustainable Student-led Community Engagement
Dr Poorna Gunasekera, University of Plymouth

  • 15.45 pm: Refreshment Break

16:00

Closing Keynote: Student Engagement, interventions and evaluation data – what keeps me awake at night
Student engagement is a critical component of learning. In this keynote, we will look at the critical links between the use of evaluation data and building the right systems for successful student interventions. Charles will provide some provocations to consider in your own institutional context. 
Dr Charles Knight, Assistant Director, Knowledge and Innovation, Advance HE

16:25

Closing remarks

16:30

Conference close

Keynote Speakers
gilly salmon speaker student engagement conference

Professor Gilly Salmon ( Ph.D., PFHEA, NTF.)

CEO and Principal Consultant, Education Alchemists Ltd.

Creating Student Engagement for the Future: Designs and Benefits

Professor Gilly Salmon will explore preferred and viable learning futures for student engagement. Looking through some different windows with intent and using a Rich Picture technique, this creative and innovative keynote will consider the multiple lenses of engagement, to include for instance, cocreation, partnership, academic engagement, evaluation design and data capture. Drawing from her extensive experience pedagogical innovation and transformation, Professor Salmon will consider how, if together we design super-well deploying the best of data, we can scale, sustain, contextualise, adopt, and adapt for students’ flexibility and for longer-term impact.

Professor Salmon will be supported by Rod Angood, an established Graphic Artist providing real time artistic images, pictures and diagrams that capture concepts, ideas and models during the keynote.

Professor Salmon is one of the world’s leading thinkers, researchers and practitioners in learning futures. She publishes, blogs & presents on pedagogical innovation and learning transformation. Her books ‘E-moderating’ and ‘E-tivities’ are considered seminal texts. Her ‘Carpe Diem’ learning design methodology is extensively deployed internationally. She has 30+ years of experience, in universities in UK, Europe and Australia. She has implemented significant educational changes. She is an Adjunct Professor at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, and Visiting Professor at the Universities of Law, Derby, and Edge Hill, in the UK.

Knight Charles original

Dr Charles Knight

Assistant Director, Knowledge and Innovation, Advance HE

Student Engagement, interventions and evaluation data – what keeps me awake at night

Student engagement is a critical component of learning. In this session, we will look at the critical links between the use of evaluation data and building the right systems for successful student interventions. Charles will provide some provocations to consider in your own institutional context.

Charles is an academic leader with a proven track record of delivery in the areas of learning and teaching and enterprise. Prior to joining Advance HE, he was Associate Dean (Student Experience) at Salford Business School where he worked with colleagues to introduce a series of innovative practices including short technical qualifications, block teaching and an increased emphasis on the use of simulations and experimental learning. He was also involved in setting up a North-West Attainment Gap group bring together business schools.

Session abstracts

Parallel Session 1, 1045 – 1145

WORKSHOP 1

Co-creation through Scholarship
Danielle Thibodeau, Graeme Hathaway and Elise Omfalos, Queen Mary University of London

Since 2022, the Queen Mary Academy at Queen Mary, University of London has been running its Learner Intern Programme (LIP). The aim of LIP is to undertake scholarship and development projects in collaboration with our diverse learner population by annually hiring interns to work on projects in partnership with educators. This workshop will use LIP as a jumping off point to discuss how scholarship can be undertaken via cocreation with learners, and strategies for better incorporating learners’ perspective into the work of developing innovative and well-evidenced learning practices. The goal of this session is to explore new models for learner engagement that contribute to evidence-based practices while supporting learner skill development and career exploration.

WORKSHOP 2

Enhancing Student Engagement through structured Personal Tutoring

Dr David Grey, UKAT

It’s time to kickback and have some fun! In this highly interactive workshop session, participants will explore how a structured programme of personal tutoring can personalise the learning experience, engage students with their studies, and enhance their success within and beyond higher education. Participants will work in groups to play UKAT’s Advising Journey design game, through which they will develop an outline personal tutoring programme that maps meaningful student support interventions to relevant points in the student journey.

WORKSHOP 3

Building student-centric services: Unlocking Innovation in Student Engagement
Colum Mackey, Greenwich Students’ Union and Tania Struetzel, University of Greenwich

This workshop will provide an overview of the Retention Project, shortlisted for the 2022 THE Award Outstanding Student Support, which provides proactive peer-to-peer support to all students through wellbeing check-in calls. This project, now in its third year, focuses on meeting students where they are at, to provide a proactive, early intervention to resolve issues they might be facing. During the calls, students are asked about their programme, wellbeing, offered advice and directly referred to the relevant University and SU services where required. The calls provide a safe, social connection with a student peer positively impacting on the sense of belonging. The workshop will discuss how the project brings together Students’ Union and different student services, and how the insights from the calls have informed improvements to university services and processes. These include follow-up research on housing and initiatives to support with the cost-of-living crisis. Prioritising students not attending classes supports Professional Services and Personal Tutors ensuring these students receive relevant, timely
support, and has significantly contributed to improving retention and completion. It is expected that upon completion of the workshop, participants will have initiated the design of their own proactive intervention tailored to their local context and student demographic.

Parallel Session 2, 1200 – 1300

PAPER 1

Using creative enquiry to empower student voice: experiences from Queen Mary University of London
Dr Louise Younie, Dr Ana Cabral and Dr Stephanie Fuller, Queen Mary University of London

(1). Through metaphorical and symbolic engagement with the different languages of the arts, voice can be given not just to the cognitive domain of experience but also emotional, tacit and ineffable dimensions (2). In this presentation, we discuss the concept of creative enquiry and how it has been used to elicit and empower student voice at Queen Mary. Creative enquiry was used as part of a curriculum enhancement project on graduate attributes where students were invited to reflect on randomly selected images. This generated deeper engagement with the attributes, their meanings and relevance to students’ study and ambitions. These discussions are now being used to support the development of resources. Creative enquiry was also used in research to explore lived experiences of students involved in co-creation projects. Alongside surveys and interviews, participants chose a postcard from a website that resonated with their experience and posted a reflection on Padlet. These reflections powerfully distilled the essence of what they have learned from the experience as individuals and future professionals. We will invite attendees to share their experiences and will discuss how creative enquiry can be used effectively.

PAPER 2

Photovoice for advanced learning among first-year BA students
Louise Taylor and Christie Johnson, London College of Communication, University of the Arts

Enabling students to succeed from the beginning of their studies is a priority for educators, as is engaging them in developing capacities for research and creative thinking. At London College of Communication, we chose to explore Photovoice as a participatory arts-based research methodology for empowering and engaging students. Over several projects, participants were encouraged to test the limits of the methodology, to produce artefacts beyond the conventional printed and digital photographic image. Our session will include contributions from students and staff involved in several Photovoice projects which emphasised the continuity between students’ creative practices and their learning development. As staff and student co-researchers, we will explore how Photovoice can empower student voices and influence policy, and enhance skills of collaboration, communication, visual literacy and research. We will reflect on how far participatory projects such as this can enhance students’ long-term learning behaviours, increase academic and creative confidence, and lead to students’ understanding themselves better as learners. We will present data and feedback, as well as selected project images and narratives. To give delegates time to engage further with images and narratives, we would propose to install a popup exhibition at the conference.

PAPER 3

Motivating international postgraduate taught students at UK business schools – bridging the chasm of student expectation and institutional reality
Ann Qian, Chester Business School

As a lecturer at the Chester Business School, I often hear our international postgraduate taught (PGT) students claim that what they experience is not what they have expected, and the mismatch has negatively impacted their motivation, satisfaction and success. UK HEIs allocate a lot of resources on supporting international students (McMahon, 2015; Cebolla-Boado et al., 2018). However, students need to be motivated to take up the offers and engage with their studies. In addition, research has acknowledged that international students could be highly adaptive if motivated (Kingston & Forland, 2008; Sewpersad et al., 2019). This research, through the perspective of psychological contract, motivation theories and IPMA (importance-performance matrix analysis), aims to explore international PGT students’ expectations and motivations of studying in a UK business school. It will identify potential gaps after students have started studies, look for factors related to their expectations and motivations, compare the impacts of those factors, provide recommendations for motivation and assisting their adaptation to UK HE criteria. The results will help underpin UK business schools’ strategy, policy and priority in marketing, recruitment and teaching delivery, inform services to be more effective in the context of limited resources (Sherry et al., 2004).

PAPER 4

Developing a data-driven module enhancement service
Jonathon Thomas, University of London

Accurate and consistent data is essential to identify and understand potential issues students are having with a module. In this session, we will look at how the University of London Worldwide is using evasys end-of-module evaluation data to shape their new module enhancement service and drive their continual service improvement agenda.

PAPER 5

Harnessing evaluation for data-driven decision making
Sophie Leslie, Swansea University

Quality enhancement is leading the direction of HE and informing quality practices, however, the need for clear data-driven practices and robust evidence to inform action highlights a number of challenges